THE ROOMS AT MADE HOTEL NYC ARE WHAT DREAMS ARE MADE OF

4 -min. read

We’ve been excited about the launch of MADE Hotel in New York’s NoMad area for some time. Now, with the official opening approaching on September 5th, and after a recent site tour of the property, we’re even more enthusiastic about this independent debut.

Most of the public spaces were still very much in progress when we toured MADE last month, so more on those soon. But, for now, feast your eyes on the lovely design-nerd details on show in MADE’s 108 rooms and suites.

As THE SHIFT discovered when speaking with Gelin, he’s one of the most hands-on hoteliers around – we even hear that he’s been spotted doing actual construction work at the site. But he did have collaborators for this vision in Studio MAI, whose team is well-known for their work on the South Congress Hotel in Austin and Gjelina restaurant in LA. Here’s what Studio MAI and Gelin dreamed up for the guest rooms…

Let’s start with that racking system, that connects the closet and desk and allows for some fun and games in getting your space just the way you like it. Maybe you don’t need or want a desk? Leave it folded up. If you prefer to sit at one for work or use it for dining or other tasks—you know what to do. If this were a chain, the system might look cheap; but in Gelin and Studio MAI’s hands, the rack looks (and feels) sturdy and stylish, the walnut shelving and brass fixtures working seamlessly against the solid white oak walls and flumed white oak flooring. The TVs are hidden behind one of those pieces of walnut, and it’s refreshing to not have one wall of an NYC-sized (read: small) room taken up with a big, black flatscreen.

Platform beds are genius in that they have storage underneath (we’re sure Studio MAI could do a roaring trade selling these to thousands of space-starved New Yorkers), and they’re topped with a mix of vintage throws, sourced from around the world (the color scheme is either indigo blue or black-red). These textiles add warmth and color to the room—which is otherwise light and airy—and they also go a long way in creating that residential feel so many hotel brands purport to have. MADE nails it by looking like the apartment of that effortlessly cool, creative friend that you crash with; you know, the kind who’s a stylist or an illustrator or photographer, someone with impeccable style and an enviable Instagram following.

The bathrooms also maintain a good balance of form and function, again making excellent use of limited space and utilizing Japanese bathroom tile by Wakei and Bastille grey limestone flooring. The sinks are the centerpiece, made from hand-carved Gascogne Blue limestone and paired with a chiseled counter made from basalt, marble and sandstone.

The suites expand on this minimal yet natural feel by mixing in a few more special design touches. Suite floors are reclaimed solid walnut and the rooms feature Kuba cloth pillows, Ankara lampshades and original vintage lamps by Bitossi and David Cressey. There are also original furniture pieces by Percival Lafer and Jean Gillon, and fabrics by Romo Group, Maharam and Kravet. The main furniture and lighting, like in the regular guest rooms, is designed by Studio MAI, exclusively for MADE. Suite bathrooms feature raw Nublado textured marble tile, a Belvedere Soapstone bathroom vanity and, in one of the suites, a Get Real Surfaces custom bathtub that makes quite the statement when you walk in.

So, if you don’t happen to have one of those artfully-styled friends with a crash pad to match, you’ll be happy to know you can book a room at MADE for your NYC visits, starting in September. Stay tuned for more from MADE before then…

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Rebecca Wallwork
Rebecca Wallwork is a writer based in Miami Beach, although you’ll also find her checking out the newest hotels in New York City. She is a former contributing editor to HotelChatter, and loves dogs and books as much as she does hotels.

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