TASMANIAN ANGELS: MEET TASMANIA’S HOT HOTEL TRIO

3 -min. read

Tasmania, with its pristine coastline, wilderness and bourgeoning dining scene, is finally getting the attention it deserves, thanks in part to a trio of hotel openings.

First up, it was the opening of Satellite Island in 2013 that really got far-flung Tassie on the international radar. A 76-acre salmon farm, just 30 miles south of Hobart, Satellite Island is accessed by helicopter or private speedboat. It’s a private island, but equally a lo-fi seaside hideaway. Both the three-bedroom ‘Summer House’ and two-bedroom ‘Boathouse’ are very much coastal chic, with reclaimed driftwood, coir mats and heavy linens. Days here are spent salty: shucking oysters, kayaking, walking the rocky coastal paths and sitting around bonfires. A perfect way to take in the wilderness.

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Next, in 2015, came Pumphouse Point. Set within the UNESCO World Heritage Central West Highlands, the hotel’s 18 rooms and suites are divided among two industrial buildings (the Shore House and the Pump Station), once used to pump water for hydroelectric power. Set 800 feet out on Lake St Clair, Australia’s deepest lake, the hotel interiors are modern but understated, fitted out in copper, brass and Tasmanian oak, with floor-to ceiling views of the glacial mountains and the deep blue lake. The serene but impressive setting lends itself to hardy activities like windswept hikes, fly-fishing, and exploring isolated corners of the lake by dinghy.

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For those looking for something a little more urban, MACq 01 will be opening in the heart of the Hobart waterfront in 2017. Moments from buzzing Salamanca Market (300 stallholders showcasing the best of Tasmanian local produce from food and drink to handcrafted timber) and the newly re-vitalised Brooke Street Pier (a floating pontoon with a handful of great local cafés and restaurants). Plus, the must-see Museum of Old and New Art (the largest privately funded museum in Australia) is on its doorstep. And the hotel itself? Each of the 114 rooms are set to tell tales of Tasmania’s past from “buried bushrangers and starving sailors to ingenious inventors and political pioneers”.

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[All photos: courtesy of hotels mentioned]

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Chloe Sachdev
Chloe Sachdev is a lifestyle journalist covering food, nightlife, culture, travel and fashion trends. She is senior features editor at Urban Junkies and has written for Condé Nast Traveller, The Telegraph, The Evening Standard, Wallpaper, Asos and MSN UK.

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